Riverview Dental Specialists

Our Quad Cities Locations

Main Location
1111 Canal Shore Drive
LeClaire, IA 52753
(563) 355-1034
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BETTENDORF LOCATION
3520 Utica Ridge Road
Bettendorf, IA 52722
(563) 359-9165
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Our Blog

Archive for the ‘Pediatric Dentistry’ Category

Manual vs. Electric Toothbrushes: What’s the Difference?

Tuesday, September 25th, 2012

Everybody is jumping on the electric toothbrush bandwagon in recent years, with many experts in the dental field claiming electric toothbrushes provide superior dental care. It’s true that electric toothbrushes are recommended for those who can’t do a good job brushing manually or who have arthritis or other conditions. But manual toothbrushes do have some advantages, according to an article we recently found including:

• Cost. While electric toothbrushes may be expensive for many people, manual toothbrushes are both inexpensive and accessible.

• Less pressure on your teeth & gums. While we can feel the amount of pressure we’re using as we grasp our manual toothbrush, we can’t feel the pressure nearly as well with an electric toothbrush. Placing too much pressure on our teeth can wear away at the tooth enamel, which causes pain, sensitivity, as well as an increased risk of tooth decay.

• Simple to pack. Manual toothbrushes are easy to carry around for those business or family trips. People are less likely to let their good dental care habits lapse on vacation with a toothbrush that they can easily bring along!

• Better for kids. Learning at a young age how to properly use a manual toothbrush helps children get a feel for how to properly take care of their oral hygiene.

Electric toothbrushes, on the other hand, are more effective in removing plaque and are considered a better alternative to maintaining gum health. Remember, whether you choose a manual or an electric toothbrush, our team encourages you to choose one with soft bristles and be sure to change the bristles on the electric brush when they become worn down. We also encourage you to replace your toothbrush every three months, when the bristles are no longer straight and firm or after you recover from a cold.

Give our team a call if you have any questions. Or, feel free to connect with us on Facebook!

Happy brushing!

Proper Brushing and Flossing Techniques

Tuesday, September 18th, 2012

When it comes to the care of your teeth, proper brushing and flossing techniques do make a difference in the health of your mouth. Establishing a daily oral care routine should not be difficult. Unfortunately, you face an overload of information from advertisements touting the latest in brushing and flossing products.

Types of brushes:

Toothbrushes come in a variety of sizes and bristle styles. Here are some tips to help you choose.

- The ends of the bristles should be rounded; jagged ends can damage your gums.
- Most individuals will benefit from a soft bristled brush. Softer bristles will be gentler on tooth enamel, even if you have a heavy hand when brushing.
- The head of the toothbrush should fit comfortably in your mouth. If the head is too large, you may not be able to properly brush your back teeth.
- Replace your toothbrush every three to four months. Frayed or worn out bristles will do more damage than good.


Brushing techniques:

While getting your teeth clean is important, over-brushing can actually be damaging to your teeth and gums. Brushing too hard can wear away the tooth enamel and cause sensitivity.

- Place your toothbrush at a 45-degree angle to the tooth surface.
- Use short, gentle back and forth strokes.
- Clean all of the surfaces of your teeth. The inside, outside, and chewing surfaces are all important.
- To brush the inside surfaces of your front teeth hold the brush vertically. Use gentle up and down brush strokes.
- Do not forget to brush your tongue.
Types of floss:

- Floss is available as waxed or unwaxed string. Waxed floss may glide more smoothly between your teeth.
- The flavoring in floss is designed to make the process more enjoyable.
- Floss tape is used in the same manner as string.
- Floss picks can be useful in reaching back teeth or if you have dexterity problems.
Flossing techniques:

To use string floss you will need a piece that measures about 18 inches in length. Wrap the ends a couple of times around your middle or index fingers. Gently work the floss back and forth between each of your teeth. You should be making a “C” shape against the tooth surface.

Be careful not to cut into your gums while flossing. If you notice any bleeding of your gums, consult your dentist. We recommend that you floss your teeth once a day. The time of day and the brushing and flossing sequence do not matter.

Every individual does have different needs and we will work with you to determine what works best for your situation. If you have questions regarding brushing techniques or which floss or toothbrush to use, ask at your next visit. Keeping your mouth healthy will make your checkups a pleasant experience.

Five ways you can avoid plaque!

Tuesday, July 10th, 2012



Our team knows nobody likes getting plaque on their teeth. Here are five other ways you can avoid that dreaded enemy of the teeth during orthodontic treatment, courtesy of WebMD.

Let’s start with brushing regularly.. Brushing your teeth twice a day with a fluoride-containing toothpaste is vital to a healthy mouth. Make sure you softly brush all the surfaces of your teeth.

Next on the list is flossing daily: a simple daily flossing between teeth clears away plaque before it can cause damage and can also clean plaque at the gum line. Plaque is known to reach the spaces between teeth.

Also, evading a trip to the dentist is probably not a great idea. Let’s say you brush and floss daily. You’re still at risk for plaque. With time, the plaque hardens and turns into tartar. Consider visiting your general dentist at least twice a year or as recommended by your dentist, and you have a lower chance of getting cavities or losing your teeth while wearing braces.

You’ll also want to stop avoiding those fruits and veggies. Believe it or not, there are foods out there that play a key role in keeping plaque off our teeth. They include apples, carrots, cucumbers and other raw fruits and vegetables. You can still eat these types of fruits and veggies if you have braces, but be sure to cut them up into bite sized pieces to avoid breaking off brackets.

Finally, before you pick up that candy bar, remember to not give in to your sweet tooth. Consuming sugary drinks or eating candy or other junk food allows sugar to stick to our teeth. The bacteria, then, becomes plaque, which turns into acid and damages our teeth. Avoiding these five bad habits keeps your plaque in check and your mouth as healthy as can be during your orthodontic treatment. If you have any questions, give us a call or ask us on Facebook!

Sealing In Your Child’s Dental Health

Tuesday, June 19th, 2012

Keeping your child’s teeth in the best possible condition will help them maintain optimum oral health for the rest of their lives. When brushing and flossing isn’t enough, we may suggest placing a dental sealant on your child’s teeth. Children who have dental sealants can decrease their chance of tooth decay by 60%! Sealants are a safe, effective way to ensure your child’s dental health for years to come.

Dental sealants work by providing a protective shield over the tiny grooves and depressions found on the chewing surfaces of teeth. While brushing and flossing is still essential even if your child has a sealant, this coating will help vulnerable areas from tooth decay by “sealing out” plaque and food.

If we think a sealant would be a good option for your child, a simple office visit is all it takes. One of our friendly dental hygienists or assistants will thoroughly clean your child’s teeth before applying the white or clear liquid-plastic material to the tooth’s surface. Sealants can protect teeth from decay for up to ten years, but they need to be checked for chipping or wearing at your child’s regular checkups.